CrossPlatformStrategy

HomePage | RecentChanges | EditorIndex | TextEditorFamilies | Preferences

Difference (from prior major revision) (no other diffs)

Changed: 17c17
* SciTE - Linux, MS Windows
* SciTE - Linux, MS Windows, BSD

Changed: 23c23
Another way to do this is to change the KeyBinding of another editor to resemble the one you're used to. Some people argue against this, because it makes you dependant on your personal configuration file,
Another way to do this is to change the KeyBinding of another editor to resemble the one you're used to. Some people argue against this, because it makes you dependent on your personal configuration file,

This way of PickingATextEditor involves choosing an editor that runs on several platforms (usually Microsoft Windows and Unix, since Apple's OSX is a version of Unix -- at least if you don't need an attactive GUI. Else you should look for real OS X support.). Editors in this category include:

A number of TinyEditors were written to emulate the KeyboardLayouts of larger editors that were too big to run on early microcomputers. Most of these emulate VI, Emacs, or WordStar, but some emulate more obscure editors with loyal cult followings (see TextEditorFamilies).

Another way to do this is to change the KeyBinding of another editor to resemble the one you're used to. Some people argue against this, because it makes you dependent on your personal configuration file, which may not be available if you're using someone else's computer. But these days we have USB "thumb drives" and live-CD operating systems, so you can literally carry your own operating environment in your pocket.

Some editors (including JOE and Emacs) come with built-in emulation modes for other popular editors.

Advantages:

Disadvantages:

Simple Example: MultiEdit is a pretty nice editor but only available on Windows.


HomePage | RecentChanges | EditorIndex | TextEditorFamilies | Preferences
Edit text of this page | View other revisions
Last edited June 18, 2012 10:27 am (diff)
Search: